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September 14th, 2012 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

We won 2012 Red Herring Top 100 Asia!

RHA2012 Top 100 Winner Badge

We are excited to share with you that JamiQ has won the 2012 Red Herring Top 100 Asia award!

This award comes at a time when social media analysis is proving to be an essential component for connecting with the groundswell, understanding the consumers and the citizenry, for effective communications and marketing.

Our commitment to building technologies to help companies, non-profit organisations and governments get straight to actionable insights in the massive torrent of social media data has proved to be deeply rewarding.

You may download our Press Release. We also invite you to share this news with your customers and partners . For more information, please contact Kelvin Quee at +65 9177 3635 or kelvin.quee@jamiq.com.

July 22nd, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary, Technology

The need for real-time analytics

The baseline for all social media interactions (it is “social” after all) demands two-way conversation, interaction, and response. At the end of the day though, with every status update or wall post entered, we still have to ask ourselves:  what is happening, and what does the data mean?

Real-time analytics is particularly useful in this area as a means to instantly view and track our performance. Rather than batch analytics, which measures the data collected in the timeframe between two events, real-time analytics allows us to make sense of data while more data is being gathered during the course of an event. Below, let’s explore 3 reasons why real-time analytics is so crucial in social media today.

  1. You need to know what is happening. Chances are, unless you have an analyst or marketing background, you will not be entirely clear on the interactions that are constantly happening on the social web. On our end, we need to know how people react when we tweet, or reveal offers and promotions on our Facebook page. Do they immediately start sharing this information? Does buzz take a while to build? Real-time analytics can provide data such as reach, views and shares, which provides crucial numerical data to analyse and measure
  2. You need to adjust to what’s happening. Depending on how people take to your posts or promotions online, you need to be able to adjust and react accordingly. For instance, if a promotion for a buy-2-get-1-free deal was offered, the amount of people who click on the link (either via a shortened link or tracked through Google Analytics for instance) and share the deal will provide a rough indication of whether there will be sufficient demand, and if supply should be adjusted accordingly.
  3. You need to measure everything that goes on in order to accurately determine the full extent of your efforts. For instance, measuring everything that is said in reaction to your posts on your Facebook wall (comments, shares), including sentiment, will provide you with a quick snapshot of how people react to posts in these categories. Through testing, you should be able to determine in the long-run which posts your audience is most enthusiastic about, as well as whether promotions are generally welcome by the audience.

Social media is constantly moving and evolving, which makes it all the more important to track and monitor the social media in real-time. Why not try out JamiQ’s social media monitoring solution while you are here?

July 6th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Additional Social Media statistics for the CHC Scandal

The recent City Harvest Scandal has pretty much piqued the interest of almost every Singaporean, religious or otherwise. Supporters have actively taken to social media to defend the Pastor and the other accused Church members at the center of this controversy, while other online netizens flamed and critiqued Sun Ho’s music career. Even Singapore Press Holdings has been “singled out” by City Harvest Church to be “dealt with”.

All that aside though, the entire scandal has generated quite a fair bit of chatter online across various social media channels. Here are some of the more interesting statistics we’ve tracked so far with JamiQ Buzz since the 25th of June.

1) It should come as no surprise that most entries actually came from Singapore. What was surprising though, was the fact that the country with the 2nd highest number of entries was Indonesia, with about 1300 entries since the 25th of June. This came mostly in the form of tweets and retweets from Indonesia, with most expressing positive sentiments, and support for Pastor Kong Hee. We assume though, that this mostly comes from Indonesians that might be church-goers of City Harvest Church, unlikely as it may seem.

On a side note, there were several Twitter handles and accounts from the US which hijacked and spammed the Twitter hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached after it started trending in Singapore.

2) Over the course of the scandal, overall chatter on the topic averaged at roughly 1400 posts per day, with the highest amount of chatter recorded on the 27th of June (close to 5000 entries). Since then however, the amount of chatter has gradually decreased as most Singaporeans lost interest in the scandal (or at least until more details get revealed in the upcoming court case) and turned their attention and social media presence elsewhere. By the 2nd of July, total entries per day barely broke the 200 mark. Based on these results, we assume that interest and chatter about this topic will increase sharply again once court proceedings begin on the 25th of July.

3) Chatter and discussion of the scandal came from a variety of media channels, most notably Twitter (close to 90% of total chatter), forums (close to 6%) and blogs (close to 2%). Interestingly, forum and blog sentiments presented overwhelming negative sentiments, while Twitter presented mostly positive sentiments. Upon closer inspection, this was mostly due to the fact that CHC supporters mainly exerted their social presence on Twitter. By retweeting positive tweets and quotes from Pastor Kong Hee and his wife, as well as through judicious usage of the hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached, the CHC supporters attempted to overturn the tide of negative sentiment that came from the horde of critical netizens. And it would seem that numerically, they succeeded.

This does raise certain questions though. Why does there seem to be more fervent support on Twitter as opposed to other mediums? Is Twitter as a social channel more accurate in expressing sentiments on the ground due to the ease of posting messages and retweeting?

4) There has generally been a wide array of content posted up by netizens critical of City Harvest Church over the scandal. Posts have varied greatly, ranging from critiques and discussions about the breadth of Sun Ho’s music career, to a financial analysis of the ways City Harvest encourage and promote tithing; there were even a number of articles which followed the evolution of Pastor Kong’s household from an ordinary HDB flat in Tampines, to a multi-million dollar home in Sentosa Cove. Generally, there has been more content generated by negative netizens – presumably because this is one outlet they can use to express their frustrations – as opposed to supporters of CHC. Generally, there has been little to no entries in the form of blog entries (or anything of substantial length) that gives a positive spin to the events surrounding Pastor Kong Hee and CHC.

Do check back on this blog for more social insights and updates as we continue monitoring this unfolding issue.

June 18th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Social Media Crisis Checklist

Crisis Checklist

Social media crises situations are like a blow beneath the belt – it may seem small and trivial at first, but the aftereffects are usually deceptively painful. And when crises happen, most people and companies are often at a loss about what to do.

Based on our experience managing and monitoring social media crises for clients across Asia, we have come up with a simple Social Media Crisis Checklist for brands to better manage their crisis situations. This checklist is designed especially for PR users, but we’re sure it will fit well with anyone managing a crisis online.

The next time you find yourself or your client in a crisis, don’t panic, just follow these steps one at a time. It’s worked for us and our clients. We’re sure it’ll work for you.

For printing and distribution, download the high-res PDF here.

Feel free to share it and we appreciate if you could credit us in your post.

June 14th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Technology

Introducing: Multitude

People often think of events as a 1 dimensional entity – you go to an event, you listen to the speakers and their presentations; if chance permits, you and the audience are allowed a question or two; and then you are left to your own devices to crystallize your take-aways from the event towards the end.

What if we could change that though? What if we could provide a way for audience members to interact with content or presentations in real-time and change the way information is fed to the audience?

Multitude is a platform built on our core JamiQ Buzz technology and visualized in the form of a real-time Twitter wall. And because everything is real-time, there are endless ways to implement interactivity into your events.  You could have it in a debate for instance, with the Twitter wall highlighting the audience’s questions for panelists. You could have it at live concerts or venues, with audience members tweeting about their experience or uploading pictures on the wall!

Multitude

For a live demo, do check it out here (requires Google Chrome or FireFox). And for any technical or sales enquiries, feel free to contact us here!

June 8th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Technology

Profitez de l’utilisation de JamiQ en Francais – Enjoy the use of JamiQ in French!

That’s right, JamiQ Buzz now offers sentiment analysis in French!

Here at JamiQ, we seek to constantly improve our offerings for our clients. Our latest update brings sentiment analysis for the French language for our JamiQ Buzz product.

To test it out, we recently monitored some of the conversations surrounding the French Presidential Elections. Here are some of the mentions we categorized with the new sentiment analysis system which revolves around mentions of election candidate Sarkozy.

In French:

Positive Negative
Nicolas Sarkozy mise sur les électeurs du FN pour faire barrage au socialisme. Il a appelé jeudi à un «sursaut national».Source : Les EchosExplorer : FN, Nicolas Sarkozy, Partis politiques, Politique,… Sarkozy récuse un financement libyen en 2007, réitéré par l’ex …France.Antilles.fr GuadeloupeA trois jours du second tour de l’élection présidentielle, le président-candidat Nicolas Sarkozy a de nou…
20minutes.frEN DIRECT: Hollande perd 1,5 point dans un sondage… Le FN nomme …20minutes.frFrançois Hollande obtient 52,5% des intentions de vote face à Nicolas Sarkozy, soit une baisse d’un point e… “Nicolas Sarkozy était prisonnier de son costume de président”: Avec, d’ailleurs, de la mauvaise foi, pu…
Metro FranceEn direct. “La gauche a abîmé la République”, juge SarkozyMetro FranceSi François Hollande et Nicolas Sarkozy se sont opposés, parfois avec virulence, hier soir à la télévision, il n’y a p… François Bayrou votera Hollande, un désaveu pour SarkozyLe Nouvel ObservateurPARIS (Reuters) – François Bayrou a infligé jeudi un camouflet à Nicolas Sarkozy en annonçant qu’il voterait pour le social…

On a whole, the system is currently roughly  85% accurate, which is reasonable – the main advantage of such sentiment analysis being that it can analyze huge chunks of data quickly to get a rough aggregate of sentiment, which was useful in determining how people felt in the few days we monitored chatter about the elections.

You can read more about our analysis of the French elections here. And of course, if you would like to get started on monitoring your upcoming campaign in France, do contact us here.

June 1st, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

The price of engagement

How much are our efforts on the social media worth?

For some time, I’ve been unable to answer clients’ questions on how they should value the entries they obtain through the social media. “How much is this blogger’s post worth?” “How much is a tweet about my client’s product in financial dollars?” Here at JamiQ, we deal with a lot of measurement and big data, but because of the different context of these posts (for instance, how would you differentiate the value between a Foursquare check-in on Twitter vs an actual Tweet about your client’s F&B outlet? Hint: I don’t think you can! Not yet anyway.), it’s often really hard to ascribe a fixed value to these posts.

But we all have to start somewhere. Cloud security company Backupify takes a more general approach in calculating the value of social media posts – taking each company’s estimated annual revenue and dividing it by the number of items of content.

This allows us to arrive at these magic numbers: a Tweet is worth USD$0.001; while a Facebook share, USD$0.024. Which means realistically, if you wanted to get 10 USD$ worth of value from Twitter alone, You would need a staggering 8,896 tweets about your product or brand.

(You can view the infographic here and the original post on it here!)

Of course, this is a really base calculation that doesn’t take into account the more indirect aspects of social media, such as the value obtained from additional eyeballs from the post, number of conversions to direct sales, etc. What it does show however, is the staggering amount of chatter and data present across the various mediums – and how the true value of engagement is often lost against the backdrop of the sheer total volume of chatter across social media.

How do we determine “true” value then? There isn’t a standard answer across brand or industry, but I can tell you – I am pretty sure it involves taking a stab in the dark and spending an arbitrary amount of money first.

More to be shared on this next week!

May 25th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Traditional Social Media vs Visual Media

Pinterest_Logo instagram

Is Pinterest and Instagram really the way forward for social media marketing?

Facebook yesterday announced the launch of its Facebook Camera app for iOS users, less than 2 months after the social network giant made headlines around the world with the news that it was acquiring Instagram, the popular photo sharing service, for a staggering 1 billion.

Besides the fact that the Facebook IPO isn’t reaching the valuation investors initially suggested, the Facebook Camera app – which by all accounts contains functions and filters which are mostly similar to Instagram – comes at a time when social media users remain highly enamoured by images, and the messages/brands/feelings they can convey. Wanna push your brand new product through social media using Facebook and Twitter? You’re more likely to enjoy greater success nowadays by snapping pictures of your product (artistically of course), choosing a nice filter, and posting it on Instagram and Pinterest. Congratulations, you’ve become a saavy visual social media marketeer!

Melodramatics aside, the rise of visual social media does pose a threat to the more traditional (you never thought you’d see the day when both of these words are used in the same space, did you?) social mediums, notably Facebook and Twitter. Already, Google+ has seen a decrease in activity since Pinterest started appearing on everyone’s social radar (report here). Sure, you can post and share photos and images on these services, but it’s not nearly the same thing. The main difference is, communities like Pinterest and Instagram were built from the ground up, with a focus on image sharing, not with the image added as an afterthought. Oddly enough, that proved to be more than enough.

So now that we know that Visual Social Media will probably be the Next Big Thing in every social media manager’s portfolio, what are some of the pitfalls we should avoid?

1) Don’t over-saturate your feed with branding

Ok, this seems like the very opposite of what you should be doing. What this basically means though, is that if your company already has a highly visible logo and brand (think Mcdonald’s golden arches for instance), the last thing you’d want to do, is to bombard your feed with more photos of those arches. A little goes a long way when it comes to images, and in this case, it’s often better to find meaningful images that will tie your brand and consumers together rather than go trigger happy with posting mundane images.

2) Don’t re-use content

Some brands make the mistake of sharing ALL their content across ALL their social media identities. One thing to note that since Instagram and Pinterest are mostly image sites, content should for the most part be different. If the same images are used across all your identities however, you’re not creating any intrinsic value for your consumers to follow all your social media identities. If a consumer could see the same photo on Facebook, why should he or she follow you on Instagram and Pinterest and be flooded by the same images when he checks in?

3) No press shots

Taking a photo that was included in a press release and uploading it on your Instagram or Pinterest profile (even if you add a filter, it REALLY doesn’t count) just smacks of laziness. Users follow brands on Instagram or Pinterest mainly because they hope to see photos or images that are less run-of-the-mill and which better reveal the inner workings of the brand or corporation. It could be just as innocent as inpromptu shots of employees preparing coffee in the morning, or the unpacking of products – shots like these are what create connections with followers.

4) Don’t ditch the community

If you start with these communities, attribute the same amount of time and effort you would to your Facebook and Twitter profiles as you would to your Instagram and Pinterest profiles. It’s really easy for followers to tell the sincere brands from the insincere ones – especially when the feeds stop coming.

April 25th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Social Media Analytics and Measurement (Part 1)

Within a B2C climate, one of the common headaches faced by marketers is trying to ascribe values or worth to things such as Facebook Likes and Posts. Others complain that with the huge amount of data readily available for companies, it becomes tiring trying to figure out what matters to your brand or department, and what doesn’t.

That said, there are a set of metrics which can be used to determine the effectiveness of your Marketing and Sales campaigns on Social Media.

Measurement Infographic

(Infographic created by the folks at Awareness – major props to them for the excellent work. Visit their website for an in-depth white paper!)

For the more mathematically inclined, there are advanced metrics for you to try out as well in order to identify and take advantage of trends.

Of course, ideally, you should have a social media listening tool already in place to obtain this data for you.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is where we come in.

April 19th, 2012 by Benjamin Koe under Commentary

Making Friends & Influencing People

Our friends over at WeAreSocial Singapore have put together a fantastic presentation on social media marketing. We of course want to emphasize slide 24: “Listening is the new shouting”. So true. If you’re looking for a place to begin your social media marketing, this is one we’d recommend.

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