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July 6th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Additional Social Media statistics for the CHC Scandal

The recent City Harvest Scandal has pretty much piqued the interest of almost every Singaporean, religious or otherwise. Supporters have actively taken to social media to defend the Pastor and the other accused Church members at the center of this controversy, while other online netizens flamed and critiqued Sun Ho’s music career. Even Singapore Press Holdings has been “singled out” by City Harvest Church to be “dealt with”.

All that aside though, the entire scandal has generated quite a fair bit of chatter online across various social media channels. Here are some of the more interesting statistics we’ve tracked so far with JamiQ Buzz since the 25th of June.

1) It should come as no surprise that most entries actually came from Singapore. What was surprising though, was the fact that the country with the 2nd highest number of entries was Indonesia, with about 1300 entries since the 25th of June. This came mostly in the form of tweets and retweets from Indonesia, with most expressing positive sentiments, and support for Pastor Kong Hee. We assume though, that this mostly comes from Indonesians that might be church-goers of City Harvest Church, unlikely as it may seem.

On a side note, there were several Twitter handles and accounts from the US which hijacked and spammed the Twitter hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached after it started trending in Singapore.

2) Over the course of the scandal, overall chatter on the topic averaged at roughly 1400 posts per day, with the highest amount of chatter recorded on the 27th of June (close to 5000 entries). Since then however, the amount of chatter has gradually decreased as most Singaporeans lost interest in the scandal (or at least until more details get revealed in the upcoming court case) and turned their attention and social media presence elsewhere. By the 2nd of July, total entries per day barely broke the 200 mark. Based on these results, we assume that interest and chatter about this topic will increase sharply again once court proceedings begin on the 25th of July.

3) Chatter and discussion of the scandal came from a variety of media channels, most notably Twitter (close to 90% of total chatter), forums (close to 6%) and blogs (close to 2%). Interestingly, forum and blog sentiments presented overwhelming negative sentiments, while Twitter presented mostly positive sentiments. Upon closer inspection, this was mostly due to the fact that CHC supporters mainly exerted their social presence on Twitter. By retweeting positive tweets and quotes from Pastor Kong Hee and his wife, as well as through judicious usage of the hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached, the CHC supporters attempted to overturn the tide of negative sentiment that came from the horde of critical netizens. And it would seem that numerically, they succeeded.

This does raise certain questions though. Why does there seem to be more fervent support on Twitter as opposed to other mediums? Is Twitter as a social channel more accurate in expressing sentiments on the ground due to the ease of posting messages and retweeting?

4) There has generally been a wide array of content posted up by netizens critical of City Harvest Church over the scandal. Posts have varied greatly, ranging from critiques and discussions about the breadth of Sun Ho’s music career, to a financial analysis of the ways City Harvest encourage and promote tithing; there were even a number of articles which followed the evolution of Pastor Kong’s household from an ordinary HDB flat in Tampines, to a multi-million dollar home in Sentosa Cove. Generally, there has been more content generated by negative netizens – presumably because this is one outlet they can use to express their frustrations – as opposed to supporters of CHC. Generally, there has been little to no entries in the form of blog entries (or anything of substantial length) that gives a positive spin to the events surrounding Pastor Kong Hee and CHC.

Do check back on this blog for more social insights and updates as we continue monitoring this unfolding issue.

March 2nd, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Corporate, Technology

Socializing during Social Media Week Singapore

If, like us, you were running around all over the island trying to make it for as many events as you could during Social Media Week, you might have seen this.

TweetWall

(Picture taken from the TodayOnline blog here)

That’s right! JamiQ, together with Swarm, were a part of the many events, discussions, parties and tweets that made up the entirety of Social Media Week Singapore. For most people, our presence was most notably felt with the TweetWall that was deployed at events throughout the duration of the week, including the launch and closing parties.

But that’s not all we did of course. Whilst everyone was busy mingling and tweeting about mingling, we were busy monitoring and recording everything that was being said about Social Media Week. Using that data, the cool folks over at We Are Social came up with a nifty little infographic to make sense of what was being said, and who was saying it.

SMWSG Infographic by We Are Social

(You can also check out their original blog post about SMWSG here!)

We’ve had lots of fun during Social Media Week and made new friends while hanging out with old ones. Can’t wait till we do it all again next year!

June 15th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Social media across Asia : Indonesia

Indonesia, the 4th largest country in the world and one of the most populous also happens to be a huge social media fan. The nation is particularly obsessed with Twitter and is home to the 2nd highest number of users in Asia, according to comSCORE. A staggering 20.8% of internet users in Indonesia visited Twitter.com in January. It is estimated that Indonesian users make up for 15% of all tweets globally and are the sixth biggest twitter user base in the world.

Indonesia-social-Media

As for facebook, Indonesia has the 2nd highest number of users in the world. This isn’t surprising as internet is mostly used for social networking, photo sharing and watching videos by Indonesia netizens. A breakdown of the trending topics from January 2011 shows that conversations online mostly revolve around entertainment including soccer, music, television shows etc.

salingsilang-socmed-id-report-2011v2-110301043448-phpapp02

Source : Silang Silang

However, social media has also evolved into another role, that of a social watchdog. Indonesians are harnessing their social networks to speak out about everyday issues including politics and civic issues. For instance, when Michelle Obama shook hands with a conservative Muslim minister on an official visit to the country, this seemingly small incident sent the twitter sphere buzzing with many criticizing the minister and accusing him of being hypocritical to traditional Islamic customs.

In another case, when the Social Services minister was spotted driving his car in a dedicated ‘bus only lane’, an alert passerby promptly snapped a photo and uploaded it on twitter. More than 10000 views and numerous angry comments later, the minister responded accepting full responsibility and agreeing to pay the fine voluntarily. A more positive example is the “Save Jakarta” movement on twitter which encourages ordinary citizens to point out problems they were facing in the city everyday and make suggestions for improvement. This became an instant viral hit and empowered faceless online citizens to take charge of their city.

Interestingly, internet users in Indonesia surf the net and connect with each other more using their smartphones, the main reason being that it’s cheap! With the three main telecommunications companies in the country constantly butting heads over market share, service plans are very affordable especially in comparison to home broadband plans which can cost up to $100 monthly. Coupled with the advent of affordable smartphones from China, Indonesian users are spoilt for choice.

Currently, there are 31 million users who make up an eighth of the 242 million strong population. By 2015, this is predicted to rise to 94 million users. It goes without  saying that marketers are taking full advantage of this new medium to reach out to all sections of the population.

May 19th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Measuring Reactions to the M1 Outage

#M1Outage has been trending on twitter since yesterday as frustrated M1 customers have taken to social media to rant about disrupted services . Using the JamiQ social media monitoring tool, we tracked this hot topic.Unsurprisingly, we saw a dramatic increase across all three telcos , with M1 being the most talked about. Starhub and Singtel spiked as tweets comparing the three providers were blasted out by irate users, with M1 coming up short.

m1 1

M1 also released two press statements on their facebook page assuring subscribers that they are trying to fix the problem and thanking customers for their patience. These received more than 700 comments, many of them negative.

m1 2

With an angry tweet just a click away in Tech-Savvy Singapore , service providers like M1 have to make sure their customers are satisfied if they want their reputation intact.

May 11th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

A Social Media Cinderella Story

The 2011 general election in Singapore were concluded last week leaving in its wake the most hotly contested fight for the ballot in Singapore history.  Many people are calling this a revolutionary election not only because of the strength displayed by the opposition, but also due to the fact that Social Media has now fundamentally changed the way politicians campaign and connect with the people.

This time round, candidates have had no choice but to engage with the public through channels like facebook and twitter, especially the youth, many of whom were first time voters. Even this segment, which has been notoriously apathetic until now, is sitting up, taking notice and even participating (hallelujah!) in the exchange of ideas online

Nicole Seah (L)

This has resulted in overnight fame for candidates like Nicole Seah (L) who is now a household name and a favourite among young people. For a short period of time, she even became the most ‘liked’ politician on facebook surpassing the omnipresent Lee Kuan Yew, the father of Singapore. Even though she has lost the election to Tin Pei Ling (R), another famous or rather infamous candidate, the online world is buzzing with praise for Nicole. This 24 year old has become such a sensation that the party she represents, NSP (National Solidarity Party) is now nicknamed the Nicole Seah Party.

A huge factor for her popularity is the online community that support and defend her through forums, blogs, twitter and facebook. This same community has lashed out at Nicole’s opponent, Tin Pei Ling labelling her as inexperienced and “boring”. One reason for this difference in treatment is perhaps the fact that Nicole is the underdog in this competition. A faction of the public feels that Pei Ling had an easy way in because of her connections to politicians. Also, she had the support of mass media outlets from the beginning of her campaign. This might have triggered the support that Nicole has received from various sides. Unfortunately, for Pei Ling the wave of criticism has not stopped despite her win. The blogs are afire with one netizen asking “why is tin pei ling in government while George yeo is not?” and openly jeering at the now ubiquitous photo of her clutching at a shopping bag from kate spade.

tweets

As for Nicole, she has the online community on her side. Using the JamiQ social media monitoring tool, we were able to measure this in a tangible manner and it was no surprise that netizens attributed more positive sentiment to Nicole’s campaign compared to Tin Pei Ling’s

Singapore was recently declared one the most “evolved” social media markets in the world. For thousands of Singaporeans, social media is not just a medium for news and information, but an integral part of their lifestyles which they use to “discuss social issues, arrange social gatherings, express their creativity, share family memories, create professional networks, do comparison shopping and decide what to eat buy and collect”. Now, it has even penetrated politics and is actively shaping how the government communicates with its people.

April 26th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Technology

Visualizing the Singapore General Elections 2011

Singapore GE2011 Tracker

The JamiQ team together with our partners at Swarm.is have released a new visualization project specifically for the Singapore General Elections 2011. This project is a showcase of technology, design, and application in real-world situations.

The Singapore General Elections 2011 Tracker is a visualisation project that reflects the true national agenda set by the social nature of online discussions and trends around Singapore’s 2011 General Elections. The goal of the project is to help the public follow the elections by separating the signals from the noise by trending the top topics being discussed and showcasing the top articles being shared. The project looks at news articles, blog posts, and Twitter data to identify the top mentioned keywords and the most shared content.

How to read the visualisation?
The visualization is made up of two main parts: Today’s Key Terms (centre) and Most Shared Content (right). The lines between Today’s Key Terms and Most Shared Contentso the co-relation between the two. Which trending topics are found is the top links. The lines trailing toward the left from Today’s Key Terms show the day-by-day history of the trends. Check back anytime for a live snapshot of what’s trending.

What data do you use?
We use news articles relating to “Singapore Elections” from Google News. Blog posts relating to “Singapore Elections” from Google BlogSearch. Twitter data with the #sgelections hashtag and mentions of “Singapore Elections”.

March 2nd, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ mentioned in IDA CEO’s speech

RADM(NS) Ronnie Tay, Chief Executive Officer, IDA Singapore, gave the opening keynote at the SiTF ICT Business Forum on 24 Feb 2011.

As part of his speech, JamiQ was highlighted as a glowing example of a Singapore company taking advantage of the convergence of technologies.

In his speech he said:

“One example of convergence is the coming together of social networking, business analytics and cloud computing, providing what is called sentiment analysis – real-time analysis and insights of what consumers are saying about products, services and policies using Internet scale resources. One of our local companies, JamiQ provides a social media dashboard for companies to monitor social media across Asian markets and languages. JamiQ uses advanced data mining and natural language processing technology to give businesses the critical insights businesses need for immediate and strategic decision-making. In Sep 2010, it launched ReputationWatch, a solution tailored for SMEs to track and analyse real-time online conversations.”

The complete speech transcript can be found here.

February 11th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ’s CEO to present at Web Wednesday

webwednesdaysingapore-logo

JamiQ’s CEO Arvind Sethumadhavan will be in the limelight at next week’s Web Wednesday in Singapore. Arvind will be sharing about the mission critical need for monitoring the social media as well as showing for the first time in public a new prototype application for real-time visualization.

Web Wednesday is an open to all gathering for all who are digital-minded. We’d love to see you there.

Event Details
When: Wednesday 16th February 2011
Time: 630pm-9pm
Where: Beer Market, Clarke Quay, The Foundry, #02-02

Find out more about the event here:

January 4th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

Bringing Back Big Brother

JamiQ was featured in the below article which was published in Marketing Magazine Singapore this month. This is a great article looking at the need for brands to look at what is being said about them online.

November 11th, 2010 by Chan Chi-Loong under Commentary

Social media and “hacking” in Singapore: Singaporeans react to 369 gangs

Recently, hacking has taken on a different meaning in Singapore.

The gang murder at Pasir Ris Downtown East two weeks back and the slashing of seven youths at Bukit Panjang just this week sent Singapore’s Twitter, Facebook and blogs into overdrive.

Ever though we just started monitoring the Bukit Panjang incident about a day ago, we’ve collected more than 500 posts — in a day! –chattering about gangs in Singapore. Posts are starting to taper off a bit as the news cycle moves on, but there is still a significant amount of chatter.

To do a thorough analysis would take too much time, but just by skimming the posts and using basic tools and filters, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are basically three themes:

Are we safe in Singapore?

The first reaction is that Singaporeans are generally shocked that this is happening. There is a significant amount of posts lamenting about Singapore’s safety and checking up on friends and family, esp. in the Bukit Panjang area. On Twitter alone there are more than 70 of such posts since yesterday afternoon.

Examples:
It still scare me that im meeting my girls where the bukit panjang slashing takes place. Need to stay safe..
HannaFernaldo

Slashing case at bukit panjang now. Wtff, singapore is getting unsafee! Really unsafeeeeee.
SriAtiqaah

Who are these stupid hooligans?

Then there are the Singaporean who are angry at these idiots and wondering why the hell this is happening in Singapore. About 40+ twitter posts.

Examples:
What is wrong w the youths in Singapore today? Downtown East 23 youths arrested, Bukit Panjang 6 youths, all between 15-23yrs old? Why???
thamwaihoong

wtfcuk .. singapore getting worse … whats with these gang stuffs man ? slashing people for no reason .. -.-
haarishakishor

What is happening to SINGAPORE man??!!! Gang armed with parangs…going on slashing spree??? Downtown east murder not enough ar??
ItsBIGBANGyg

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