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July 22nd, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary, Technology

The need for real-time analytics

The baseline for all social media interactions (it is “social” after all) demands two-way conversation, interaction, and response. At the end of the day though, with every status update or wall post entered, we still have to ask ourselves:  what is happening, and what does the data mean?

Real-time analytics is particularly useful in this area as a means to instantly view and track our performance. Rather than batch analytics, which measures the data collected in the timeframe between two events, real-time analytics allows us to make sense of data while more data is being gathered during the course of an event. Below, let’s explore 3 reasons why real-time analytics is so crucial in social media today.

  1. You need to know what is happening. Chances are, unless you have an analyst or marketing background, you will not be entirely clear on the interactions that are constantly happening on the social web. On our end, we need to know how people react when we tweet, or reveal offers and promotions on our Facebook page. Do they immediately start sharing this information? Does buzz take a while to build? Real-time analytics can provide data such as reach, views and shares, which provides crucial numerical data to analyse and measure
  2. You need to adjust to what’s happening. Depending on how people take to your posts or promotions online, you need to be able to adjust and react accordingly. For instance, if a promotion for a buy-2-get-1-free deal was offered, the amount of people who click on the link (either via a shortened link or tracked through Google Analytics for instance) and share the deal will provide a rough indication of whether there will be sufficient demand, and if supply should be adjusted accordingly.
  3. You need to measure everything that goes on in order to accurately determine the full extent of your efforts. For instance, measuring everything that is said in reaction to your posts on your Facebook wall (comments, shares), including sentiment, will provide you with a quick snapshot of how people react to posts in these categories. Through testing, you should be able to determine in the long-run which posts your audience is most enthusiastic about, as well as whether promotions are generally welcome by the audience.

Social media is constantly moving and evolving, which makes it all the more important to track and monitor the social media in real-time. Why not try out JamiQ’s social media monitoring solution while you are here?

July 6th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Additional Social Media statistics for the CHC Scandal

The recent City Harvest Scandal has pretty much piqued the interest of almost every Singaporean, religious or otherwise. Supporters have actively taken to social media to defend the Pastor and the other accused Church members at the center of this controversy, while other online netizens flamed and critiqued Sun Ho’s music career. Even Singapore Press Holdings has been “singled out” by City Harvest Church to be “dealt with”.

All that aside though, the entire scandal has generated quite a fair bit of chatter online across various social media channels. Here are some of the more interesting statistics we’ve tracked so far with JamiQ Buzz since the 25th of June.

1) It should come as no surprise that most entries actually came from Singapore. What was surprising though, was the fact that the country with the 2nd highest number of entries was Indonesia, with about 1300 entries since the 25th of June. This came mostly in the form of tweets and retweets from Indonesia, with most expressing positive sentiments, and support for Pastor Kong Hee. We assume though, that this mostly comes from Indonesians that might be church-goers of City Harvest Church, unlikely as it may seem.

On a side note, there were several Twitter handles and accounts from the US which hijacked and spammed the Twitter hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached after it started trending in Singapore.

2) Over the course of the scandal, overall chatter on the topic averaged at roughly 1400 posts per day, with the highest amount of chatter recorded on the 27th of June (close to 5000 entries). Since then however, the amount of chatter has gradually decreased as most Singaporeans lost interest in the scandal (or at least until more details get revealed in the upcoming court case) and turned their attention and social media presence elsewhere. By the 2nd of July, total entries per day barely broke the 200 mark. Based on these results, we assume that interest and chatter about this topic will increase sharply again once court proceedings begin on the 25th of July.

3) Chatter and discussion of the scandal came from a variety of media channels, most notably Twitter (close to 90% of total chatter), forums (close to 6%) and blogs (close to 2%). Interestingly, forum and blog sentiments presented overwhelming negative sentiments, while Twitter presented mostly positive sentiments. Upon closer inspection, this was mostly due to the fact that CHC supporters mainly exerted their social presence on Twitter. By retweeting positive tweets and quotes from Pastor Kong Hee and his wife, as well as through judicious usage of the hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached, the CHC supporters attempted to overturn the tide of negative sentiment that came from the horde of critical netizens. And it would seem that numerically, they succeeded.

This does raise certain questions though. Why does there seem to be more fervent support on Twitter as opposed to other mediums? Is Twitter as a social channel more accurate in expressing sentiments on the ground due to the ease of posting messages and retweeting?

4) There has generally been a wide array of content posted up by netizens critical of City Harvest Church over the scandal. Posts have varied greatly, ranging from critiques and discussions about the breadth of Sun Ho’s music career, to a financial analysis of the ways City Harvest encourage and promote tithing; there were even a number of articles which followed the evolution of Pastor Kong’s household from an ordinary HDB flat in Tampines, to a multi-million dollar home in Sentosa Cove. Generally, there has been more content generated by negative netizens – presumably because this is one outlet they can use to express their frustrations – as opposed to supporters of CHC. Generally, there has been little to no entries in the form of blog entries (or anything of substantial length) that gives a positive spin to the events surrounding Pastor Kong Hee and CHC.

Do check back on this blog for more social insights and updates as we continue monitoring this unfolding issue.

June 1st, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

The price of engagement

How much are our efforts on the social media worth?

For some time, I’ve been unable to answer clients’ questions on how they should value the entries they obtain through the social media. “How much is this blogger’s post worth?” “How much is a tweet about my client’s product in financial dollars?” Here at JamiQ, we deal with a lot of measurement and big data, but because of the different context of these posts (for instance, how would you differentiate the value between a Foursquare check-in on Twitter vs an actual Tweet about your client’s F&B outlet? Hint: I don’t think you can! Not yet anyway.), it’s often really hard to ascribe a fixed value to these posts.

But we all have to start somewhere. Cloud security company Backupify takes a more general approach in calculating the value of social media posts – taking each company’s estimated annual revenue and dividing it by the number of items of content.

This allows us to arrive at these magic numbers: a Tweet is worth USD$0.001; while a Facebook share, USD$0.024. Which means realistically, if you wanted to get 10 USD$ worth of value from Twitter alone, You would need a staggering 8,896 tweets about your product or brand.

(You can view the infographic here and the original post on it here!)

Of course, this is a really base calculation that doesn’t take into account the more indirect aspects of social media, such as the value obtained from additional eyeballs from the post, number of conversions to direct sales, etc. What it does show however, is the staggering amount of chatter and data present across the various mediums – and how the true value of engagement is often lost against the backdrop of the sheer total volume of chatter across social media.

How do we determine “true” value then? There isn’t a standard answer across brand or industry, but I can tell you – I am pretty sure it involves taking a stab in the dark and spending an arbitrary amount of money first.

More to be shared on this next week!

June 2nd, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Twitter-Tweetdeck : It’s official

After a few weeks of ‘will they-wont they’ speculation about Twitter and tweetdeck, it was officially confirmed last week. Twitter is all set to acquire Tweedeck, a third party interface, for $40 million US (SGD $49.8 million)

Tweetdeck is a start up based in London that allows users to customize their tweeting experience by integrating twitter with other social platforms such as foursquare and facebook onto a single dashboard, enabling them to “tweet like a pro“. Although the startup could not turnover a profit until now, endorsements from the likes of celebrities such as Ashton Kutcher, has made it very popular among twitter users.

twitter1

Throughout May, there was a lot of discussion online regarding the potential takeover. In the last few days, since it was made official, there is still a lot of buzz proving how popular tweetdeck is among twitter users. In the span of 4 days, the JamiQ social media monitoring tool recorded close to 1600 entries with the buzz peaking on May 26th, the day after the deal was announced.

As for how people feel about this so called social media shake-up, we can look to the sentiment analysis.

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For the most part, the online community expressed mixed feelings about the deal with some stating that the “Tweetdeck deal may signal Twitter becoming less open” while others were questioning whether Twitter would eliminate Tweetdeck altogether (they did buy tweetdeck…. to kill or not to kill………… that is the ?… i do hope they keep it. OR learn from it. @twitter). Others were outright negative taking jabs at the platform itself, with one user sayingTwitter doesn’t seem to do a terribly good job with their own apps. No wonder they had to buy Tweetdeck and others. Another chimed in with “If Twitter had 40 mil to buy tweetDeck, they should have the money to hire some decent coders”

And as usual, the ones with a lighter view brought some humour to the discussion, adding that “#RandomThoughts Glad that @Twitter got to buy @TweetDeck. Now we know who to blame when mentions insist on not loading”

May 24th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Should HR integrate Social Media Monitoring tools into screening processes?

Whether you’re looking for a job or want to keep the one you have,HR professionals would advise you to follow one golden rule when it comes to using Social Media: Never say anything online that you would be uncomfortable saying in person. Take note because a large portion of hiring managers take your online persona as seriously as they do your resume and credentials. In fact, many companies have formal policies in place that require HR managers to look for information online about employees.

Some companies have taken this to the next level by using social media monitoring tools to filter potential candidates as well as track current employees. The rationale behind this move is that employees are brand ambassadors. Thus, they are required to be responsible digital citizens who will uphold their own reputations as well their employers’. As for potential candidates, HR managers say that monitoring tools are a great way to screen and filter. For instance, something as simple as a spelling mistake could be considered a red flag. Listed below are the top reasons why employers disregard candidates during online screening

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On the other side, it is natural to wonder whether this is pushing things too far. Images of Big Brother come to mind when we imagine every facebook “like” or Linkedin status update being monitored and judged. Also, we should consider the fact that personal information, such as your political affiliation, religion or even looks, could be used in a discriminatory manner.

Overall, it is valid for the company to require employees to act appropriately on Social networks but they should make sure this information is used in a safe and confidential manner. Moreover, HR professionals should understand that monitoring should be only be used to understand the candidate better, it should not be relied upon entirely when hiring someone. As for employees and potential candidates, they should take care to be responsible online, avoid common pitfalls and always follow the golden rule.

May 19th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Measuring Reactions to the M1 Outage

#M1Outage has been trending on twitter since yesterday as frustrated M1 customers have taken to social media to rant about disrupted services . Using the JamiQ social media monitoring tool, we tracked this hot topic.Unsurprisingly, we saw a dramatic increase across all three telcos , with M1 being the most talked about. Starhub and Singtel spiked as tweets comparing the three providers were blasted out by irate users, with M1 coming up short.

m1 1

M1 also released two press statements on their facebook page assuring subscribers that they are trying to fix the problem and thanking customers for their patience. These received more than 700 comments, many of them negative.

m1 2

With an angry tweet just a click away in Tech-Savvy Singapore , service providers like M1 have to make sure their customers are satisfied if they want their reputation intact.

January 26th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Technology

JamiQ is now crisis ready!

When a crisis hits and mentions of your brand suddenly increases, JamiQ is able to pick up on that trend and immediately send you a notification by email. This new feature uses a unique and intelligent algorithm to predict a moving sensitivity benchmark based on historical data trends within a Topic.

When a spike in the buzz chart exceeds this benchmark, an alert is immediately created and sent to the customer’s email even when the customer is not logged into JamiQ.

JamiQ customers can adjust the spike detection to focus on a particular market, media type, influence level, and even adjust the sensitivity level to ensure all potential crisis are picked up. This feature dramatically improves reaction time for reputation and crisis management.
Spike Detection

This feature is currently available to all existing and new JamiQ customers. For more information on this feature and JamiQ’s social media monitoring solutions, drop us an email at questions@jamiq.com.

October 18th, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

Chinese language sentiment detection now available

JamiQ is proud to announce a monumental milestone today. Automated sentiment detection is now available for the Chinese language. This new feature allow our customers to monitor online content written in the simplified Chinese script which opens a wealth of opportunities including the world’s largest Internet market: China.

Through the incredible work of our R&D team, JamiQ has taken a huge step forward delivering one of the most requested feature. This feature is currently live and available to all JamiQ customers.

The example screenshots below showcase the monitoring of the brand NetEase. NetEase operates a leading interactive online and wireless community in China and is a major provider of Chinese language content and services through our online games, wireless value-added services and Internet portal businesses.

chinese sentiment chart

Above: Charting sentiment on NetEase Topic. Red areas indicate negative sentiment, where green indicates positive.

chinese sentiment data

Above: Live data stream with filters set to show only content with negative sentiment.

September 13th, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ mentioned in The Business Times today

Business Times 13092010

Thanks to our wonderful client and friend at GetIT Comms, we’re mentioned in today’s Business Times. Brilliant article on social media monitoring.

September 3rd, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

SingTel and JamiQ launch social media reputation management solution for businesses

ReputationWatch available exclusively on SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.
Singapore, 3 September 2010 – Asia’s leading Social Media Monitoring solutions provider, JamiQ, today announced the launch of a new social media reputation management solution on the SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.
ReputationWatch is an easy-to-use reputation management service designed for small and medium-sized businesses. It is built on JamiQ’s unique social media monitoring technology to allow businesses to track real-time online conversations about their brands in their local market.
Users will receive timely email alerts about highly localised and relevant conversations on social media platforms such as blogs, forums, social networks, microblogs, and even on news sites all over the world. Users will also have access to a comprehensive dashboard which provides a trending analysis of conversations, as well as a complete historical archive of past conversations tracked.
“A restaurant could use ReputationWatch to understand which dishes their customers like the best. A bridal boutique could listen for brides-to-be looking for a wedding gown,” said Kelvin Quee, Head of Partnerships at JamiQ.
“The social media is a huge and extremely complex universe. Conversations are taking place all the time and from diverse sources. Our ability to capture all this data and filter out the noise gives immediate value to our customers.”
Lee Kai Hock, SingTel’s Vice President of Business Marketing, said, “It is important for companies to find new ways to serve their customers better and operate more efficiently. Cloud computing services such as ReputationWatch enable businesses to improve productivity, simplify their operations and significantly lower their costs.
“SingTel’s cloud services are offered on a monthly subscription basis, which allows companies to avoid high upfront investments in IT infrastructure, such as servers and systems. They relieve companies of the complexities of managing IT systems and software, thus allowing businesses to maintain tighter control of their cashflows.”
ReputationWatch is available on SingTel’s myBusiness Portal at: http://mybusiness.singtel.com/catalogue/reputationwatch

ReputationWatch available exclusively on SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.

Singapore, 3 September 2010 – Asia’s leading Social Media Monitoring solutions provider, JamiQ, today announced the launch of a new social media reputation management solution on the SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.

ReputationWatch is an easy-to-use reputation management service designed for small and medium-sized businesses. It is built on JamiQ’s unique social media monitoring technology to allow businesses to track real-time online conversations about their brands in their local market.

Users will receive timely email alerts about highly localised and relevant conversations on social media platforms such as blogs, forums, social networks, microblogs, and even on news sites all over the world. Users will also have access to a comprehensive dashboard which provides a trending analysis of conversations, as well as a complete historical archive of past conversations tracked.

“A restaurant could use ReputationWatch to understand which dishes their customers like the best. A bridal boutique could listen for brides-to-be looking for a wedding gown,” said Kelvin Quee, Head of Partnerships at JamiQ.

“The social media is a huge and extremely complex universe. Conversations are taking place all the time and from diverse sources. Our ability to capture all this data and filter out the noise gives immediate value to our customers.”

Lee Kai Hock, SingTel’s Vice President of Business Marketing, said, “It is important for companies to find new ways to serve their customers better and operate more efficiently. Cloud computing services such as ReputationWatch enable businesses to improve productivity, simplify their operations and significantly lower their costs.

“SingTel’s cloud services are offered on a monthly subscription basis, which allows companies to avoid high upfront investments in IT infrastructure, such as servers and systems. They relieve companies of the complexities of managing IT systems and software, thus allowing businesses to maintain tighter control of their cashflows.”

ReputationWatch is available on SingTel’s myBusiness Portal at: http://mybusiness.singtel.com/catalogue/reputationwatch

ReputationWatch’s Basic Pack starts at S$19.89 per month (incl. GST).

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