Blog

Keep up with the latest at JamiQ.

May 11th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

A Social Media Cinderella Story

The 2011 general election in Singapore were concluded last week leaving in its wake the most hotly contested fight for the ballot in Singapore history.  Many people are calling this a revolutionary election not only because of the strength displayed by the opposition, but also due to the fact that Social Media has now fundamentally changed the way politicians campaign and connect with the people.

This time round, candidates have had no choice but to engage with the public through channels like facebook and twitter, especially the youth, many of whom were first time voters. Even this segment, which has been notoriously apathetic until now, is sitting up, taking notice and even participating (hallelujah!) in the exchange of ideas online

Nicole Seah (L)

This has resulted in overnight fame for candidates like Nicole Seah (L) who is now a household name and a favourite among young people. For a short period of time, she even became the most ‘liked’ politician on facebook surpassing the omnipresent Lee Kuan Yew, the father of Singapore. Even though she has lost the election to Tin Pei Ling (R), another famous or rather infamous candidate, the online world is buzzing with praise for Nicole. This 24 year old has become such a sensation that the party she represents, NSP (National Solidarity Party) is now nicknamed the Nicole Seah Party.

A huge factor for her popularity is the online community that support and defend her through forums, blogs, twitter and facebook. This same community has lashed out at Nicole’s opponent, Tin Pei Ling labelling her as inexperienced and “boring”. One reason for this difference in treatment is perhaps the fact that Nicole is the underdog in this competition. A faction of the public feels that Pei Ling had an easy way in because of her connections to politicians. Also, she had the support of mass media outlets from the beginning of her campaign. This might have triggered the support that Nicole has received from various sides. Unfortunately, for Pei Ling the wave of criticism has not stopped despite her win. The blogs are afire with one netizen asking “why is tin pei ling in government while George yeo is not?” and openly jeering at the now ubiquitous photo of her clutching at a shopping bag from kate spade.

tweets

As for Nicole, she has the online community on her side. Using the JamiQ social media monitoring tool, we were able to measure this in a tangible manner and it was no surprise that netizens attributed more positive sentiment to Nicole’s campaign compared to Tin Pei Ling’s

Singapore was recently declared one the most “evolved” social media markets in the world. For thousands of Singaporeans, social media is not just a medium for news and information, but an integral part of their lifestyles which they use to “discuss social issues, arrange social gatherings, express their creativity, share family memories, create professional networks, do comparison shopping and decide what to eat buy and collect”. Now, it has even penetrated politics and is actively shaping how the government communicates with its people.

April 26th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Technology

Visualizing the Singapore General Elections 2011

Singapore GE2011 Tracker

The JamiQ team together with our partners at Swarm.is have released a new visualization project specifically for the Singapore General Elections 2011. This project is a showcase of technology, design, and application in real-world situations.

The Singapore General Elections 2011 Tracker is a visualisation project that reflects the true national agenda set by the social nature of online discussions and trends around Singapore’s 2011 General Elections. The goal of the project is to help the public follow the elections by separating the signals from the noise by trending the top topics being discussed and showcasing the top articles being shared. The project looks at news articles, blog posts, and Twitter data to identify the top mentioned keywords and the most shared content.

How to read the visualisation?
The visualization is made up of two main parts: Today’s Key Terms (centre) and Most Shared Content (right). The lines between Today’s Key Terms and Most Shared Contentso the co-relation between the two. Which trending topics are found is the top links. The lines trailing toward the left from Today’s Key Terms show the day-by-day history of the trends. Check back anytime for a live snapshot of what’s trending.

What data do you use?
We use news articles relating to “Singapore Elections” from Google News. Blog posts relating to “Singapore Elections” from Google BlogSearch. Twitter data with the #sgelections hashtag and mentions of “Singapore Elections”.

empty div to make footer stick