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Keep up with the latest at JamiQ.

July 22nd, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary, Technology

The need for real-time analytics

The baseline for all social media interactions (it is “social” after all) demands two-way conversation, interaction, and response. At the end of the day though, with every status update or wall post entered, we still have to ask ourselves:  what is happening, and what does the data mean?

Real-time analytics is particularly useful in this area as a means to instantly view and track our performance. Rather than batch analytics, which measures the data collected in the timeframe between two events, real-time analytics allows us to make sense of data while more data is being gathered during the course of an event. Below, let’s explore 3 reasons why real-time analytics is so crucial in social media today.

  1. You need to know what is happening. Chances are, unless you have an analyst or marketing background, you will not be entirely clear on the interactions that are constantly happening on the social web. On our end, we need to know how people react when we tweet, or reveal offers and promotions on our Facebook page. Do they immediately start sharing this information? Does buzz take a while to build? Real-time analytics can provide data such as reach, views and shares, which provides crucial numerical data to analyse and measure
  2. You need to adjust to what’s happening. Depending on how people take to your posts or promotions online, you need to be able to adjust and react accordingly. For instance, if a promotion for a buy-2-get-1-free deal was offered, the amount of people who click on the link (either via a shortened link or tracked through Google Analytics for instance) and share the deal will provide a rough indication of whether there will be sufficient demand, and if supply should be adjusted accordingly.
  3. You need to measure everything that goes on in order to accurately determine the full extent of your efforts. For instance, measuring everything that is said in reaction to your posts on your Facebook wall (comments, shares), including sentiment, will provide you with a quick snapshot of how people react to posts in these categories. Through testing, you should be able to determine in the long-run which posts your audience is most enthusiastic about, as well as whether promotions are generally welcome by the audience.

Social media is constantly moving and evolving, which makes it all the more important to track and monitor the social media in real-time. Why not try out JamiQ’s social media monitoring solution while you are here?

August 4th, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Influence metrics for B2C brands

As the prevalence and influence of social media on consumer behaviour grows, it has become vital for brands to track conversations online and derive meaningful insights that will aid the decision making process. Other than numbers and figures for ROI purposes, monitoring can also provide brands with data on influencers. Influencers can range from ‘blue chip’ sites like the New York Times, which is relied on for information on media, politics and news, to individuals such as Perez Hilton, whose gossip blog is considered an authority on celebrities and entertainment.Increasingly, consumers are looking for product reviews online and listening to what users recommend. Therefore, it is important for brands to identify among these users, those who are potent influencers.

There are numerous influence metrics systems popping up everyday some becoming popular with your everyday social savvy individual as well. One such example is Klout, which takes into account the numer of twitter followers you have, the number of times you are retweeted as well as your facebook network to give you a Klout Score ranging from 1 to 100.

Take the Dalai Lama for instance. According to Klout , he has a score of 86 with an influence on 758,000 people. In terms of the topics he is influential about, it ranges from celebrities (suprisingly) to more expectedly, religion and spirituality. Klout also allows users to specifically identify who the Dalai Lama most influences, ranging from organizations to individuals.


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These metrics prove useful for various reasons. First, identifying influential people in your brand’s sphere and getting them to say positive things about you gives you invaluable positive buzz. Secondly, you can target a particular segment of users effectively if you can identify who is influencing them. However, companies should refrain from relying singly on such metrics as they do not take into account other factors such as sentiment. The influence score fluctuates up and down based on how much you are talked about on the twitter sphere, so it could be dangerous to label someone as highly influential as the score is based on data that is constantly changing and could be affected by misleading jolts. For example, negative posts about a person could drive up their influence score because they are creating buzz. However this does not equal influence in terms of being able to cause positive action . In conjunction with other metrics such as sentiment analysis and analysing actual data that the metric tool records, companies can get a better picture of who is truly influential.

June 1st, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Social media across Asia : China

In countries across Asia, young people have made similar number friends offline as they have made online. But, in China, youngsters actually have made a larger pool of friends online as a combination of socio-economic factors coupled with higher rate of internet penetration has led to a union of online and offline lives. Due to rural-urban migration many youngsters are separated from their families and find social networking a convenient way to keep in touch with those back home. Another reason often cited is the one child policy which has resulted in most young people growing up in single child homes. Social media has given them a chance to connect to people and share information on a daily basis.

Note that compared to internationally popular sites like facebook, myspace, YouTube and twitter, home-grown social networking sites are used heavily by the Chinese population. After the government disabled these platforms, numerous home-grown clone sites sprung up catering to various segments of the market. Some sites are more popular among 1st tier cities while others cater to 2nd and lower tiered cities. Accordingly, preference varies according to age as well. Techrice used their data to come up with the distribution across segments shown below.

China segmented

Qzone : Launched in 2005, this is the biggest site in terms of number of users which ranges anywhere between 300-480 million registered users according to various reports. Users are able to write blogs, keep an online diary and listen to music. This site is most popular among 2nd tier and 3rd tier cities in China.

Pengyou : Launched by the same company as Qzone, Pengyou meaning “friend” caters to both students and white collar workers. Pengyou is a networking platform for friends in real life whereas Qzone is mostly a network for instant messaging friends on QQ, the most popular IM platform in China.

Renren : this site has around 160 million registered users and is still growing. It is very popular among young people in 1st and 2nd tier cities, especially university students. It started off as Xiaonei.com, and was considered a carbon coby of Facebook with similar layout and the trademark shade of blue. Now, Renren has gained its own place in the social media space in China with 31 million active users monthly. In April 2011, it filed for an IPO in the US offering shares on the NYSE raising over US$743 million dollars.

Kaixin001: Another facebook clone that became one of the fastest growing sites in China by launching apps and games that is available on facebook. Kaixin, unlike Renren is targeted at the white collar worker who spends upto 9 hours in front of the computer each day. Accordingly the user interface is simpler and designed to be more intuitive to use.

Some unique usage patterns

  • Chinese netizens are the most likely to share a negative product review online. 62% of them attested to this compared to the global average of 41%
  • Personal: 1. Staying in touch is the most frequent use of social media 2.Read content 3.Make new friend
  • Business use: 1. Highlight personal expertise 2. Build network contacts  3. Identify lead
  • Chinese state-owned companies have been a late and slow adopter of social media compared to Chinese private firms and foreign subsidiaries in China.

china-internet-users-2010

According to a report last year, China has close to 460 million internet users with 34.3% internet penetration. This is up 19.1% from 2009 and still growing. With such a massive pool of potential consumers, the scope for monitoring is boundless. Web analytics is still shaky in China but monitoring what this community says about your brand is essential for any company.  According to a Nielson poll, Chinese netizens are the most likely to share a negative product review online, 62% of them attested to this compared to the global average of 41%. With stats like these, it would be prudent to have a constant eye on one of the most lucrative online communities in the world.

January 26th, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Technology

JamiQ is now crisis ready!

When a crisis hits and mentions of your brand suddenly increases, JamiQ is able to pick up on that trend and immediately send you a notification by email. This new feature uses a unique and intelligent algorithm to predict a moving sensitivity benchmark based on historical data trends within a Topic.

When a spike in the buzz chart exceeds this benchmark, an alert is immediately created and sent to the customer’s email even when the customer is not logged into JamiQ.

JamiQ customers can adjust the spike detection to focus on a particular market, media type, influence level, and even adjust the sensitivity level to ensure all potential crisis are picked up. This feature dramatically improves reaction time for reputation and crisis management.
Spike Detection

This feature is currently available to all existing and new JamiQ customers. For more information on this feature and JamiQ’s social media monitoring solutions, drop us an email at questions@jamiq.com.

September 15th, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Commentary

How to manage your brand online

Entrepreneurs Digest 15092010

This article was a contributed piece exclusively for the Sept/Oct issue of Entrepreneurs’ Digest. This was done in conjunction with the launch of ReputationWatch in Singapore.

September 3rd, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

SingTel and JamiQ launch social media reputation management solution for businesses

ReputationWatch available exclusively on SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.
Singapore, 3 September 2010 – Asia’s leading Social Media Monitoring solutions provider, JamiQ, today announced the launch of a new social media reputation management solution on the SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.
ReputationWatch is an easy-to-use reputation management service designed for small and medium-sized businesses. It is built on JamiQ’s unique social media monitoring technology to allow businesses to track real-time online conversations about their brands in their local market.
Users will receive timely email alerts about highly localised and relevant conversations on social media platforms such as blogs, forums, social networks, microblogs, and even on news sites all over the world. Users will also have access to a comprehensive dashboard which provides a trending analysis of conversations, as well as a complete historical archive of past conversations tracked.
“A restaurant could use ReputationWatch to understand which dishes their customers like the best. A bridal boutique could listen for brides-to-be looking for a wedding gown,” said Kelvin Quee, Head of Partnerships at JamiQ.
“The social media is a huge and extremely complex universe. Conversations are taking place all the time and from diverse sources. Our ability to capture all this data and filter out the noise gives immediate value to our customers.”
Lee Kai Hock, SingTel’s Vice President of Business Marketing, said, “It is important for companies to find new ways to serve their customers better and operate more efficiently. Cloud computing services such as ReputationWatch enable businesses to improve productivity, simplify their operations and significantly lower their costs.
“SingTel’s cloud services are offered on a monthly subscription basis, which allows companies to avoid high upfront investments in IT infrastructure, such as servers and systems. They relieve companies of the complexities of managing IT systems and software, thus allowing businesses to maintain tighter control of their cashflows.”
ReputationWatch is available on SingTel’s myBusiness Portal at: http://mybusiness.singtel.com/catalogue/reputationwatch

ReputationWatch available exclusively on SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.

Singapore, 3 September 2010 – Asia’s leading Social Media Monitoring solutions provider, JamiQ, today announced the launch of a new social media reputation management solution on the SingTel myBusiness Cloud Computing portal.

ReputationWatch is an easy-to-use reputation management service designed for small and medium-sized businesses. It is built on JamiQ’s unique social media monitoring technology to allow businesses to track real-time online conversations about their brands in their local market.

Users will receive timely email alerts about highly localised and relevant conversations on social media platforms such as blogs, forums, social networks, microblogs, and even on news sites all over the world. Users will also have access to a comprehensive dashboard which provides a trending analysis of conversations, as well as a complete historical archive of past conversations tracked.

“A restaurant could use ReputationWatch to understand which dishes their customers like the best. A bridal boutique could listen for brides-to-be looking for a wedding gown,” said Kelvin Quee, Head of Partnerships at JamiQ.

“The social media is a huge and extremely complex universe. Conversations are taking place all the time and from diverse sources. Our ability to capture all this data and filter out the noise gives immediate value to our customers.”

Lee Kai Hock, SingTel’s Vice President of Business Marketing, said, “It is important for companies to find new ways to serve their customers better and operate more efficiently. Cloud computing services such as ReputationWatch enable businesses to improve productivity, simplify their operations and significantly lower their costs.

“SingTel’s cloud services are offered on a monthly subscription basis, which allows companies to avoid high upfront investments in IT infrastructure, such as servers and systems. They relieve companies of the complexities of managing IT systems and software, thus allowing businesses to maintain tighter control of their cashflows.”

ReputationWatch is available on SingTel’s myBusiness Portal at: http://mybusiness.singtel.com/catalogue/reputationwatch

ReputationWatch’s Basic Pack starts at S$19.89 per month (incl. GST).

October 22nd, 2009 by Benjamin Koe under Technology

Brand new Filters

Today we’re proud to announce that we now have available the most anticipated features since JamiQ began beta testing! Most of our beta users have been using JamiQ to monitor conversations of their brands online amassing huge amounts of data. Previously, the only way to drill down into the data was to download them all into Excel and go through it the manual way.

Not any more. JamiQ is proud to announce the Filters!

Want to only see the conversations on blogs from your country? How about just a look at what’s negative or influential? Now you can from right within each Topic. This new Filter Feature you now see above the Topic works on both the Charts and Data pages.

We’ve also made it really easy to Filter down to what’s important. Clicking on the country or media in the Top 5 boxes jumps you directly to the data you want to see.

Also, if you feel that everything loads up a little faster now, that’s because we’ve upgraded to new servers that have more processors than I have fingers.

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