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July 22nd, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary, Technology

The need for real-time analytics

The baseline for all social media interactions (it is “social” after all) demands two-way conversation, interaction, and response. At the end of the day though, with every status update or wall post entered, we still have to ask ourselves:  what is happening, and what does the data mean?

Real-time analytics is particularly useful in this area as a means to instantly view and track our performance. Rather than batch analytics, which measures the data collected in the timeframe between two events, real-time analytics allows us to make sense of data while more data is being gathered during the course of an event. Below, let’s explore 3 reasons why real-time analytics is so crucial in social media today.

  1. You need to know what is happening. Chances are, unless you have an analyst or marketing background, you will not be entirely clear on the interactions that are constantly happening on the social web. On our end, we need to know how people react when we tweet, or reveal offers and promotions on our Facebook page. Do they immediately start sharing this information? Does buzz take a while to build? Real-time analytics can provide data such as reach, views and shares, which provides crucial numerical data to analyse and measure
  2. You need to adjust to what’s happening. Depending on how people take to your posts or promotions online, you need to be able to adjust and react accordingly. For instance, if a promotion for a buy-2-get-1-free deal was offered, the amount of people who click on the link (either via a shortened link or tracked through Google Analytics for instance) and share the deal will provide a rough indication of whether there will be sufficient demand, and if supply should be adjusted accordingly.
  3. You need to measure everything that goes on in order to accurately determine the full extent of your efforts. For instance, measuring everything that is said in reaction to your posts on your Facebook wall (comments, shares), including sentiment, will provide you with a quick snapshot of how people react to posts in these categories. Through testing, you should be able to determine in the long-run which posts your audience is most enthusiastic about, as well as whether promotions are generally welcome by the audience.

Social media is constantly moving and evolving, which makes it all the more important to track and monitor the social media in real-time. Why not try out JamiQ’s social media monitoring solution while you are here?

July 6th, 2012 by Tan Wei Shen under Commentary

Additional Social Media statistics for the CHC Scandal

The recent City Harvest Scandal has pretty much piqued the interest of almost every Singaporean, religious or otherwise. Supporters have actively taken to social media to defend the Pastor and the other accused Church members at the center of this controversy, while other online netizens flamed and critiqued Sun Ho’s music career. Even Singapore Press Holdings has been “singled out” by City Harvest Church to be “dealt with”.

All that aside though, the entire scandal has generated quite a fair bit of chatter online across various social media channels. Here are some of the more interesting statistics we’ve tracked so far with JamiQ Buzz since the 25th of June.

1) It should come as no surprise that most entries actually came from Singapore. What was surprising though, was the fact that the country with the 2nd highest number of entries was Indonesia, with about 1300 entries since the 25th of June. This came mostly in the form of tweets and retweets from Indonesia, with most expressing positive sentiments, and support for Pastor Kong Hee. We assume though, that this mostly comes from Indonesians that might be church-goers of City Harvest Church, unlikely as it may seem.

On a side note, there were several Twitter handles and accounts from the US which hijacked and spammed the Twitter hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached after it started trending in Singapore.

2) Over the course of the scandal, overall chatter on the topic averaged at roughly 1400 posts per day, with the highest amount of chatter recorded on the 27th of June (close to 5000 entries). Since then however, the amount of chatter has gradually decreased as most Singaporeans lost interest in the scandal (or at least until more details get revealed in the upcoming court case) and turned their attention and social media presence elsewhere. By the 2nd of July, total entries per day barely broke the 200 mark. Based on these results, we assume that interest and chatter about this topic will increase sharply again once court proceedings begin on the 25th of July.

3) Chatter and discussion of the scandal came from a variety of media channels, most notably Twitter (close to 90% of total chatter), forums (close to 6%) and blogs (close to 2%). Interestingly, forum and blog sentiments presented overwhelming negative sentiments, while Twitter presented mostly positive sentiments. Upon closer inspection, this was mostly due to the fact that CHC supporters mainly exerted their social presence on Twitter. By retweeting positive tweets and quotes from Pastor Kong Hee and his wife, as well as through judicious usage of the hashtags #IbelieveintheCHCCrossover and #mytrustisnotbreached, the CHC supporters attempted to overturn the tide of negative sentiment that came from the horde of critical netizens. And it would seem that numerically, they succeeded.

This does raise certain questions though. Why does there seem to be more fervent support on Twitter as opposed to other mediums? Is Twitter as a social channel more accurate in expressing sentiments on the ground due to the ease of posting messages and retweeting?

4) There has generally been a wide array of content posted up by netizens critical of City Harvest Church over the scandal. Posts have varied greatly, ranging from critiques and discussions about the breadth of Sun Ho’s music career, to a financial analysis of the ways City Harvest encourage and promote tithing; there were even a number of articles which followed the evolution of Pastor Kong’s household from an ordinary HDB flat in Tampines, to a multi-million dollar home in Sentosa Cove. Generally, there has been more content generated by negative netizens – presumably because this is one outlet they can use to express their frustrations – as opposed to supporters of CHC. Generally, there has been little to no entries in the form of blog entries (or anything of substantial length) that gives a positive spin to the events surrounding Pastor Kong Hee and CHC.

Do check back on this blog for more social insights and updates as we continue monitoring this unfolding issue.

June 1st, 2011 by Mythreyi Krishnan under Commentary

Social media across Asia : China

In countries across Asia, young people have made similar number friends offline as they have made online. But, in China, youngsters actually have made a larger pool of friends online as a combination of socio-economic factors coupled with higher rate of internet penetration has led to a union of online and offline lives. Due to rural-urban migration many youngsters are separated from their families and find social networking a convenient way to keep in touch with those back home. Another reason often cited is the one child policy which has resulted in most young people growing up in single child homes. Social media has given them a chance to connect to people and share information on a daily basis.

Note that compared to internationally popular sites like facebook, myspace, YouTube and twitter, home-grown social networking sites are used heavily by the Chinese population. After the government disabled these platforms, numerous home-grown clone sites sprung up catering to various segments of the market. Some sites are more popular among 1st tier cities while others cater to 2nd and lower tiered cities. Accordingly, preference varies according to age as well. Techrice used their data to come up with the distribution across segments shown below.

China segmented

Qzone : Launched in 2005, this is the biggest site in terms of number of users which ranges anywhere between 300-480 million registered users according to various reports. Users are able to write blogs, keep an online diary and listen to music. This site is most popular among 2nd tier and 3rd tier cities in China.

Pengyou : Launched by the same company as Qzone, Pengyou meaning “friend” caters to both students and white collar workers. Pengyou is a networking platform for friends in real life whereas Qzone is mostly a network for instant messaging friends on QQ, the most popular IM platform in China.

Renren : this site has around 160 million registered users and is still growing. It is very popular among young people in 1st and 2nd tier cities, especially university students. It started off as Xiaonei.com, and was considered a carbon coby of Facebook with similar layout and the trademark shade of blue. Now, Renren has gained its own place in the social media space in China with 31 million active users monthly. In April 2011, it filed for an IPO in the US offering shares on the NYSE raising over US$743 million dollars.

Kaixin001: Another facebook clone that became one of the fastest growing sites in China by launching apps and games that is available on facebook. Kaixin, unlike Renren is targeted at the white collar worker who spends upto 9 hours in front of the computer each day. Accordingly the user interface is simpler and designed to be more intuitive to use.

Some unique usage patterns

  • Chinese netizens are the most likely to share a negative product review online. 62% of them attested to this compared to the global average of 41%
  • Personal: 1. Staying in touch is the most frequent use of social media 2.Read content 3.Make new friend
  • Business use: 1. Highlight personal expertise 2. Build network contacts  3. Identify lead
  • Chinese state-owned companies have been a late and slow adopter of social media compared to Chinese private firms and foreign subsidiaries in China.

china-internet-users-2010

According to a report last year, China has close to 460 million internet users with 34.3% internet penetration. This is up 19.1% from 2009 and still growing. With such a massive pool of potential consumers, the scope for monitoring is boundless. Web analytics is still shaky in China but monitoring what this community says about your brand is essential for any company.  According to a Nielson poll, Chinese netizens are the most likely to share a negative product review online, 62% of them attested to this compared to the global average of 41%. With stats like these, it would be prudent to have a constant eye on one of the most lucrative online communities in the world.

March 2nd, 2011 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ mentioned in IDA CEO’s speech

RADM(NS) Ronnie Tay, Chief Executive Officer, IDA Singapore, gave the opening keynote at the SiTF ICT Business Forum on 24 Feb 2011.

As part of his speech, JamiQ was highlighted as a glowing example of a Singapore company taking advantage of the convergence of technologies.

In his speech he said:

“One example of convergence is the coming together of social networking, business analytics and cloud computing, providing what is called sentiment analysis – real-time analysis and insights of what consumers are saying about products, services and policies using Internet scale resources. One of our local companies, JamiQ provides a social media dashboard for companies to monitor social media across Asian markets and languages. JamiQ uses advanced data mining and natural language processing technology to give businesses the critical insights businesses need for immediate and strategic decision-making. In Sep 2010, it launched ReputationWatch, a solution tailored for SMEs to track and analyse real-time online conversations.”

The complete speech transcript can be found here.

May 12th, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ Appoints Arvind Sethumadhavan as CEO

Arvind Profile (Edited)JamiQ today announced the appointment of Arvind Sethumadhavan as Chief Executive Officer.

Based in Singapore, Arvind will be responsible for strategic sales and partnerships globally as well as drive the vision for JamiQ’s next-generation social media monitoring offerings.

Arvind joins JamiQ from GroupM where he has been for 10 years serving various senior management roles in China, Malaysia and Singapore, driving their ROI practice as CEO of GroupM Business Science Asia Pacific.
Most recently he was Partner, Client Leadership at Mindshare Asia Pacific responsible for managing key global accounts across multiple industries including banking, fast food retailing, alcohol & spirits, and consumer electronics & durables. His primary focus was to enable clients to extract maximum value from integrated marketing plans taking advantage of online platforms with greater accountability through the use of advanced data management and marketing analytics solutions.

Prior to GroupM Arvind worked with TNS China, Millward Brown Hong Kong, IMRB India, Initiative Media India and thus become an expert in data management for Asia.

“Arvind brings a wealth of experience and expertise in the field of marketing and data analysis. He is the perfect leader our company needs to bring it to the next level,” said Co-founder, Benjamin Koe.

“Arvind in a true visionary and the plans we have mapped out for our next-generation solutions will ensure client are able to extract maximum mileage from their marketing strategies, both online and offline.”

“We are only beginning to scratch the surface and uncovering the true potential of gathering insights from the social media, however I am very proud about the foundation the team have laid at JamiQ and very excited about the possibilities,” said CEO, Arvind Sethumadhavan.

“We envision a future where the actionable insights extracted by our solutions will dramatically change the way businesses in Asia make strategic marketing decisions.”

February 2nd, 2010 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

JamiQ talks to Buzzmedia

JamiQ speaks with David Wang of Buzzmedia about social media monitoring in Asia.

July 28th, 2009 by Benjamin Koe under Corporate

New Chinese, Korean, and Japanese data sources

Monitoring the social media in Asia calls for more coverage than simply English language content.

The team at JamiQ today has added new Asian data sources to the Add Topic interface. These include major Chinese, Korean, and Japanese news and blog search engines.

We now have Baidu, iAsk (Sina), Naver, Technorati Japan, and Google China Blog Search. These data sources give you the ability to search in local language and cover the majority of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese sites. If you need to add other sites/sources, you can always input your own RSS feeds.

Do note that JamiQ’s sentiment detection currently does not work with non-English content. But tracking mentions, influence, and market segmentation works great.

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